Archive for the ‘Pond Prescriptions’ Category

Water Garden Winterizing

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Preparing a pond for winter is just as important as spring preparation. All of the debris should be removed from your water garden, especially if you have fish. We prefer creating an aeration system to heaters, but either or both is an option. Your pump should be removed if you are not going to use it for aeration. Storing it indoors in distilled water will prolong its life. Hardy potted plants should be pruned flush with their container and put into the deepest part of the pond.

Spring Opening

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Anyone living in a colder climate becomes anxious to get their pond running as soon as possible. A few warm days in early spring is all it takes to trigger spring fever. Patience is a virtue with your pond’s spring care. Fish and plant kills can happen easily if you disturb their environment too soon. Temperatures should hover around 50 degrees consistently for at least 7 to 10 days and the extended forecast does not show harsh or freezing conditions.

Duck, Duck, GOOSE

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

These migratory birds are one of the biggest nuisances for large pond owners. There are many options available. Here are three of the most effective things to try. First of all, geese are grass eaters. If you chemically treat their nesting and feeding areas early in the spring, it will make the grass upsetting to their digestive system. Secondly, if the size of your pond allows, stake a line along the perimeter approximately 10″ high. Even though geese can fly in and out of the water, they also like to walk the shoreline getting in and out of the water. If the line is there, they often become extremely frustrated and will look for other water sources. Using strobe lights is our third suggestion. If you notice the geese nesting [Read More…]

Overwintering Fish

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

If you have fish in your water garden, always check your pond throughout the winter months. Your fish’s metabolism will slow down and they will go to the bottom of the pond. To provide oxygen during the freezing temperatures you need to keep a hole in the ice to release the build-up of toxins. Having an aeration system or heater running will help keep the hole open unless we experience exceptionally cold temps for an extended period of time. In which case, you will need to break up the ice manually.

Aquatic Plants

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Water plants are just another way to maintain an ecological balance in your water garden. A variety of surface, submerged and marginal plants will help keep your water cleaner, provide oxygen for fish and help starve out algae growth by eating unwanted nutrients in the water.